Written language disorders
26/05/2016
Attention Deficit Disorders with or without Hyperactivity (ADD/ADHD)
26/05/2016

Oral language disorders

  • A number of call signs must attract the attention of parents :100%
  • Lack of language at eighteen-month-old
  • Lack of word combination at twenty-four-month-old
  • Unintelligible language over twenty-four-month-old
  • No syntax over thirty-six-month-old
  • No use of personal pronoun ‘I’ over thirty-six-month-old

DELAY IN SPEECH

A delay in speech consists in an alteration of the phonetic structure of words, with mistakes in the combination of juxtaposed segments (phonemes) influenced by different neighbouring segments, while said segments are correctly pronounced when isolated. This disorder first translates into a persistence of ‘baby-speech’ at the age of three or four. Later this trouble manifests itself by a lack of acquisition of certain consonants while the language is otherwise normal (choice and order of words).

DELAY IN LANGUAGE

Generally speaking, there are two possibilities: the lag can be exclusively chronological (the child acquires language in a normal order but this acquisition is stretched over time with an abnormal lag over a few months, even one or two years), most of the time however, the disorder is all at once chronological, qualitative and quantitative. In addition to elements confirming a delay in speech, difficulties related to language construction can appear. These difficulties mainly concern the expression: a limited vocabulary, difficulties in acquiring new words, approximate simplified syntax, unused tenses, and confusion about linking words. When the problem concerns comprehension, the difficulties revolve more around understanding full sentences than isolated words.

Normal language development

  • A vocabulary of 1 500 to 2 000 words. They understand concrete, everyday language. Besides, they start to understand comparative adjectives.
  • IThey use different tenses. They start to make short accounts using juxtaposed independent sentences
  • Their speech gets more audible. Complex groups are being assimilated
  • They use time adverbs such as ‘tomorrow’, ‘today’, or ‘now’
  • They ask a lot of questions
  • 1000 words (adults have 12 000 to 40 000 words)
  • Almost every phoneme (they don’t usually master ‘ch’ and ‘j’ which are later acquired at the age of four)
  • They start to identify colours, dimensional adjectives; simple notions of space (up/down, before/behind)
  • They can sing and recite nursery rhymes
  • They can ask and answer questions like ‘where?’, ‘what?’, or ‘who?’
  • Understand 2 000 to 2 600 words
  • Make complex sentences and subordinate clauses/li>
  • Make less and less mistakes in conjugation
  • Appreciate a conversation, define simple words
  • Use time prepositions such as ‘before’, ‘after’, or ‘during’...
  • Understand abstract words like ‘difference’, more complex spatial notions like ‘stand with your back to me’
  • Correctly use the gender and number of words
  • Use a proper syntax even if the account remains short without a real chronological order
  • Recognize and voice differences between objects
  • Use all determiners
Little girl is writing at the desk  in preschool

Written language disorders

Dyslexia can be defined as serious and lasting troubles in acquiring written language in normally intelligent children presenting no sensorial troubles or serious affective disorders. Multiple cognitive troubles could cause dyslexia. A ‘simple’ delay in learning can be wrongly confused with dyslexia.

Read more

Normal language development

  • A vocabulary of 1 500 to 2 000 words. They understand concrete, everyday language. Besides, they start to understand comparative adjectives.
  • IThey use different tenses. They start to make short accounts using juxtaposed independent sentences
  • Their speech gets more audible. Complex groups are being assimilated
  • They use time adverbs such as ‘tomorrow’, ‘today’, or ‘now’
  • They ask a lot of questions
  • Understand 2 000 to 2 600 words
  • Make complex sentences and subordinate clauses/li>
  • Make less and less mistakes in conjugation
  • Appreciate a conversation, define simple words
  • Use time prepositions such as ‘before’, ‘after’, or ‘during’...
  • Understand 2 000 to 2 600 words
  • Make complex sentences and subordinate clauses/li>
  • Make less and less mistakes in conjugation
  • Appreciate a conversation, define simple words
  • Use time prepositions such as ‘before’, ‘after’, or ‘during’...
  • Understand abstract words like ‘difference’, more complex spatial notions like ‘stand with your back to me’
  • Correctly use the gender and number of words
  • Use a proper syntax even if the account remains short without a real chronological order
  • Recognize and voice differences between objects
  • Use all determiners
Little girl is writing at the desk  in preschool

Written language disorders

Dyslexia can be defined as serious and lasting troubles in acquiring written language in normally intelligent children presenting no sensorial troubles or serious affective disorders. Multiple cognitive troubles could cause dyslexia. A ‘simple’ delay in learning can be wrongly confused with dyslexia.

Read more
Orthophonie / Psychologie / Orientation scolaire
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